Chuunibyou demo Koi ga Shitai! 11 – Colourless World


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It is a supreme irony that the one thing apparently hurting Rikka was also filling her world with colour and laughter. Her Chuunibyou, while extreme and often nonsensical was nevertheless an essential part of her life and the one constant that allowed her to make friends and create a club out of her widening social group. Without it she has become, not only normal, but also boring and lacking the liveliness that we have become used to over the course of the series. Rikka is a character that has had to deal with the loss of her father at a young age, thus resulting in her Chuunibyou, that she was going to come back to ‘reality’ sooner or later was also obvious, but the way she has gone about it seems to be far more damaging than her Chuunibyou ever could be. Throughout the series Touka has talked about Rikka using her Chuunibyou to run away from reality and simply ignore the truth that is before her eyes. She has viewed Rikka’s Chuunibyou as dangerous and also annoying at times, especially during the summer holiday arc where she tried to force the issue of their father’s death onto Rikka. Furthermore, Touka’s attitude towards Rikka doesn’t help matters, and by constantly attempting to force her own reality onto Rikka, Touka inevitably strengthens Rikka’s dependence on her alter ego and dream world. Rikka’s world and her alter ego as the wielder of the Tyrant’s Eye become central to her everyday life precisely because her family, through their rejection of Chuunibyou has alienated her. Read more of this post

Sukitte Ii na yo 10 – Lies and Misunderstandings


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The introduction of Kai would always bring with it another set of problems, specifically for Yamato, but his characters also helped to demonstrate the uneasy relationship that Yamato has with Mei. Up until this point Yamato has demonstrated how shallow he can be, and how damaging his willingness to help anyone and everyone has been to his relationship with Mei. The appearance of Megumi prompts Mei to question her position with Yamato, almost convincing herself that she never had any business falling in love with Yamato in the first place. For his part, Yamato is portrayed to be as naïve and new to love as Mei; his willingness to help others, along with his general attitude further exacerbates an already tense situation. As Mei and Yamato grow further apart, kicking themselves about what they did or didn’t do, what they said or wanted to say, we began to see how alike these two characters are. Mei and Yamato initially appear as polar opposites with Yamato’s popularity portrayed in stark contrast to the almost invisible nature of Mei. Partly because of this Mei continued to back herself into a corner, blaming herself for allowing Yamato to model and get close to Megumi. It is an uneasy relationship because Mei’s overly cautious and arguably introverted nature, coupled with Yamato’s ineptitude and inability to understand the consequences of his actions have gradually been building up and gaining ever more power and influence. They clearly love each other, but because of these problems they continue to bump into other issues that potentially hurt their relationship. Read more of this post

Psycho-Pass 09 – Self-Destructive Society


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While a significant chunk of this week’s Psycho-Pass was given over to our cyborg hunter and his sophistry, the most interesting element was the self-destructive nature of the Sibyl system and its impact upon society. Psycho-Pass presents a fascinating world, a vision of a dystopian society within which your every thought can be tracked and quantified. It presents us with a highly stratified and controlled society where simple test scores can determine where you work and what your life will be like. A world where your thoughts, attitudes and abilities can be measure and quantified, thus determining your entire life, will create a highly stratified and structured society. In doing so, such a society would arguably create distinct and destructive social divisions, and with no ability to move and change your life, what might be dissatisfaction in another society can become dangerous and destructive. To be reliant on technology is one thing, but to let the technology control your life is something very different. Senguji Toyohisa makes an interesting point in his interview when he asks what the difference between a human who relies upon technology such as the costume devices or Ai secretaries and automatons and those who are full cyborg’s. At the most basic level there is little difference, with both wholly reliant on the technology to allow them to function in one way or another. On the other hand, those who have full cybernetic bodies have become utterly reliant upon their technology. Read more of this post

Chuunibyou demo Koi ga Shitai! 10 – Coming to Terms with Reality


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Coming to terms with a terrible loss will never be easy, with various people reacting in different ways and coping as best they can with what support is available to them. As Chuunibyou demo Koi ga Shitai has progressed we have learned more about Rikka and the reasons behind her Chuunibyou, and how it is a defence mechanism that she has used to deal with the sudden death of her father. It is difficult and arguably wrong to pin the blame for Rikka’s current personality on any one individual, with her entire family sharing shouldering the burden. As families go Rikka’s is shown in stark contrast to the family life of Yuuta, she lacks the warm, understanding family that he has, with a flat that is largely empty due to Touka’s work hours. Her grandparents clearly care for her, but due to her grandfathers personality means that her ways of coping with loss are viewed as childish and silly. The sudden nature of her fathers death, coupled with her entire family keeping his illness from her clearly had a significantly stronger impact on Rikka than they could ever imagine. Her Chuunibyou along with her quest for the Unseen Horizon was her way of making sense of world that no longer seemed to care about her and perhaps was viewed to be a dark and dangerous place. This is further emphasised by Rikka labelling her grandparents house as the headquarters of her enemy The Administration Bureau and calling Touka the ‘Priestess’. Read more of this post

Sukitte Ii na yo 09 – Missing the Point


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While previous episodes have focussed on the problems that Mei and Yamato face with the appearance of Megumi and Yamato’s increasing popularity as a model, this week takes a slightly different approach. Up to this point Mei has been dealing with a substantial inferiority complex along with the emotional and psychological baggage of her past. The appearance of Megumi prompts Mei to question her position with Yamato, almost convincing herself that she never had any business falling in love with Yamato in the first place. For his part, Yamato is portrayed to be as naïve and new to love as Mei; his willingness to help others, along with his general attitude further exacerbates an already tense situation. As Mei and Yamato grow further apart, kicking themselves about what they did or didn’t do, what they said or wanted to say, we began to see how alike these two characters are. Mei and Yamato initially appear as polar opposites with Yamato’s popularity portrayed in stark contrast to the almost invisible nature of Mei. Partly because of this Mei continued to back herself into a corner, blaming herself for allowing Yamato to model and get close to Megumi. Read more of this post

Psycho-Pass 08 – Shoot First, Ask Questions Later


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As the series progresses, the more dangerous, flawed and downright stupid the Sibyl system becomes, and although there have been certain elements that try to portray the system in a positive light, it is becoming increasingly difficult to see this way of working as good. At first there was the suggestion that the Sibyl system was a positive force that helped to control and maintain society, and through its use society was ordered with everything running smoothly and ‘properly’. However, as is becoming ever clearer, the Sibyl system is fatally and intrinsically flawed, forcing people down the path of self-destruction and causing far more damage to society than it may ever prevent. It is a system that forces people down the path of no return, while creating the perfect conditions for those with the ability to exploit its flaws, thus allowing for crime and criminals to almost function with impunity. Through its use we have seen characters lose their lives for no real reason, while other are forced into one job because their Psycho-Pass readings are too high for them to left alone. The Sibyl system has created and maintains a highly stratified society where aptitude scores and Psycho-Pass levels dictate where you work and what kind of lifestyle you have. Read more of this post

Chuunibyou demo Koi ga Shitai! 09 – Group Therapy


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Over the past couple of episodes it has become clear that Rikka’s Chuunibyou was a defense mechanism that she created in order to cope with the sudden loss of her father. The sudden loss of her father and the fragmentary nature of her family have evidently had a significant impact upon how Rikka views the world. By labelling Touka as the ‘Priestess’, and her grandparent’s house as The Administration Bureau Rikka can make sense of the feelings and emotions that these people and places create. Rikka is making sense out of chaos in many respects by attaching these labels to the virus places that have caused her pain. Furthermore, her father keeping his illness a secret from her arguably influenced how she viewed the world at the time, thus allowing her to link her fantasy world and conspiracy theories with the sudden disappearance of the stable family she once knew. The sudden nature with which her life was upturned and changed can be thought of as almost dream-like. With Rikka creating the Unseen Horizon to make sense of everything and giving her something to work towards. Read more of this post