Psycho-Pass 02 – Decisions and Consequences


A world where your thoughts, attitudes and abilities can be measured and quantified, thus determining your entire life style will create a highly stratified and structured society. In doing so it is also arguably creating distinct and potentially destructive social divisions, and with no ability to move up and change your current way of life, what might be dissatisfaction can become destructive and dangerous. These similar ideas are present in numerous cyber-punk anime, not least Akira, where the highly stratified society leads to protests and social disorder on a large scale. Such are further present in real life, with protests against government plans and attitudes towards where ones place in society are. Akira, and now Psycho-Pass mirrors this with the use of their various systems and bodies in order to police the spaces between these distinct areas of society, looking out for those who have finally snapped. Read more of this post

Psycho-Pass 01 – The illusion of choice


A society where technology control our every move, making decisions for us and determining the fate of the world – in such a society he lines between what is real and what is fantasy become blurred, melding into one another until indistinguishable. The idea that technology can not only control society, but also determine who is guilty and their future actions is a scary thought, and questions the role of humans and human decisions on the very basic of levels. Such a dystopian worldview could have been snatched straight from the pages of a Phillip K. Dick work like ‘Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep’ (Blade Runner), ‘We Can Remember it for You Wholesale’ (Total Recall), or perhaps even ‘Minority Report’. And that is because largely it is, the plot synopsis and general aesthetic and thematic choices present in Psycho-Pass are straight out of any Phillip K. Dick novel. Read more of this post