The Illogicalzen Top Twelve Anime of 2012


Konachan.com - 107410 black_hair cube_(artist) game_cg japanese_clothes kakyouin_kotone kimi_to_boku_to_eden_no_ringo night

It appears to be that time of the year where many bloggers begin to list their favourite anime and make lists that may differ wildly from each other while containing a few common links. I didn’t do this last year, partly because I wasn’t really as involved with anime blogging as I am now, but this year shall be different! I have to admit that I don’t really believe in lists, finding them too restrictive and forcing you into picking your favourite, but for lack of a better format, and because I am taking part in Kidd’s Ani-Bloggers Choice Awards I shall have to come up with a list and an order for my favourite anime for the year. But, even thought they will be in order, these anime are essentially equal for me since I enjoyed them for different reasons and at different times, and in all cases there were points where they didn’t quite work as well. But, before I get into the list proper there are a few honourable mentions, all series that I enjoyed but weren’t quite good enough to make onto my Top Twelve List for a variety of reasons. Read more of this post

The portrayal of marginal groups and foreigners in anime


 

Marginal groups are quite problematic for Japan, and while they are used in anime and manga, we don’t see them used particularly often. What is so fascinating about the use of marginal or minority groups in anime is that their portrayal and the subsequent reactions of many other characters in the series bears a striking resemblance to the attitudes towards such groups in real life. Marginal groups such as the Zainichi Koreans and Ainu are central to the creation and maintenance of a Japanese national discourse about a shared identity and culture. As Wirth (1945) suggests, marginal groups, because of their physical or cultural characteristics, are singled out from the rest of society for differential and unequal treatment, and therefore begin to view themselves as objects of collective discrimination (Wirth, 1945:347). Read more of this post

Sakamichi no Apollon – A love letter to jazz


There is something truly evocative about music, it has an ability to conjure up images of the past, inspire us and drive out imaginations. While not all music can have the same effect on us, there is still something about the medium itself that continues to move people’s hearts and minds, creating new friendships, reaffirming old ones and creating strong and lasting links between individuals and groups. Sakamichi no Apollon captures this beauty almost perfectly, it demonstrates that no matter what differences there may be between people there will always by the commonality of music, it also touched me in quite a deep and specific way, largely because of the jazz theme. Read more of this post